Daily Dose of Classical // Day 21: Passio Domini nostri Jesu Christi secundum Joannem- Arvo Pärt

This hour-long work by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt was premiered in 1982, and poignantly recounts Christ’s Passion as told by St. John. Pärt, of course, is my favorite composer, so it’s no surprise that I love this work tremendously, but all bias aside, I consider this work one of the most ethereal vocal works ever written. Pärt’s use of silence as a way of pausing to meditate on the gospel, his use of monophony and homophony and the counterpoint-like dialogue between the winds and voice are so gorgeous.  I’ve never heard such an intimate recounting of Christ’s Passion as that of Pärt.

If you aren’t familiar with Arvo Pärt, there’s one thing you should know–something which impacts his very impulse and desire to compose: his faith in God as an Eastern Orthodox Christian. This faith and love for God alone drives his work and compels him to write what he considers to be music that seeks to represent the beauty and simplicity of God. Thus to some, his incredible compositional journey from serialism, period of compostional silence (and coincidental resurgence of faith), and finally to the emergence of his tintinnabuli style, what many call as a sort of  (and dare I say it, because he rejects the term) “holy minimalism,” is a journey most intriguing and has attracted many musicologists and music lovers alike. The reason for his work is a lofty one, and it certainly permeates with every note he composes. Those that give their talents for the glory of God are always rewarded, and this is certainly tangibly evident from the beauty of Pärt’s music.

I highly recommend you to check out his many other incredible works, such as Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten, Tabula Rasa, Festina Lente and Stabat Mater. Enjoy, and have a wonderful Thursday!

((secret)) garden

Fun with the D5100 before a photoshoot today! I love being alone and wandering with my camera in hand. It’s therapeutic and calms my nerves.

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Kaleidoscope eyes.

DSC_0333 DSC_0343I was rummaging through old film cameras at a garage sale today and left with two lens adapters (that fit both my film and DSLR!) that are essentially a kaleidoscope for your camera. The effect is amazing, and did I mention they were only $4 for the pair? Love.

Sound of Silence

Originally posted on Spinning Atlas:

stop sign sunset

Sometimes we have to stop and wait. There is no reason for it and we aren’t waiting for anything in particular. We are just waiting; thinking. Sometimes we stop because we are told to. We obey the laws of the land without a second thought. A simple stop sign will bring us to a screeching halt, ending our forward momentum instantaneously. No matter the reason, stopping can be the most important part of the day.

So much of life is goal oriented, chipping away each day until we reach our goals. We stress, push, and fight to accomplish our goals each and every minute of every day. If we aren’t working hard we are doing some sort of mindless activity like watching television. This is well and good; everyone needs a balance of work and relaxation. What most people don’t incorporate into their days is time to stop and think…

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rosy morning. 

Spending a glorious morning on a gorgeous campus choreographing a belly dance scene for an opera I’m in. I have it gooood.